Category Archives: Tom Wolfe

Famous ‘New Journalist’ Author Tom Wolfe Dead At Age 88

Most folks knew him through his well-known works like The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, The Bonfire of the Vanities, The Right Stuff and classic others.

Today, people are mourning the passing of American writer and journalist Tom Wolfe. A report in Tuesday’s Huffington Post states that Wolfe died at a New York City hospital at age 88 due to an infection. His agent confirmed the news to the New York Times; Wolfe leaves behind his wife Sheila, daughter Alexandra and son Tommy.

Tom Wolfe was also well-known for attending public events in a signature white suit, his favorite.

He was called a pioneer for changing the face of reporting with his book The New Journalism in 1973. In it, he showed how journalists could offer the kinds of literary delight found in books with a blend of hard reporting.

The clever author with the satiric wit came up with some phrases people have frequently used like the “Me” generation and “radical chic.”

Wolfe had often said that man is concerned about how his peers look at him. Status and reputation were important to the author, and that is partly why he enjoyed dressing like a businessman in his white suits, silk ties and high-shirt collars.

Tom Wolfe was born in Virginia and had earlier pursued an athletic career in major league baseball. He won multiple literary citations, including the American Book Award for The Right Stuff.

Author and Journalist Tom Wolfe Dead at 88

The country lost one of its greatest writing pioneers of recent times when author and journalist Tom Wolfe passed away on Monday. The author of the bestsellers “The Right Stuff” and “The Bonfire of the Vanities” died after being hospitalized with an infection in New York City, according to a statement by his agent Lynn Nesbit. He was 88 years old.

Wolfe was best known for introducing the literary style now known as New Journalism. Employed in non-fiction pieces, this style relies on detailed descriptions which come as a result of the authors immersing themselves in their subjects. Through the use of extensive dialogue and various points of view, authors are able to more fully detail their writings.

Born in Richmond, Virginia in 1930, Wolfe eventually received a degree from Washington and Lee University where he honed his writing skills as sports editor of the college newspaper and co-founder of the literary magazine, Shenandoah. Wolfe went on to earn a Ph.D. at Yale University. Wolfe began his career as a reporter for the Springfield Union, eventually working his way up to the Washington Post and the New York Herald-Tribune.

Wolfe dabbled in a variety of writing forms, from newspaper reporting to non-fiction to fiction. The highly-acclaimed “The Bonfire of the Vanities” was his first attempt at fiction writing and the book went on to become a major motion picture, solidifying Wolfe’s place as one of America’s greatest writers.